Ancient rhino tooth revives hope of bringing back lost species

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Ancient rhino tooth revives hope of bringing back lost species

In a major first, the 1.7-million-year-old specimen may also show us to how modern humans evolved

Sarah Knapton

Genetic information has been extracted from a 1.7-million-year-old rhino tooth, raising hopes that crucial data about extinct animals could be retrieved, or lost species revived.

The discovery is one million years older than the oldest DNA sequenced, from a 700,000-year-old horse, and is the earliest yet recorded.

Researchers at the universities of Cambridge and Copenhagen identified an almost complete set of proteins, known as a proteome, in the dental enamel of the ancient rhino, which was found in Dmanisi in Georgia...

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