It's true after all: If you want to be less fat, eat less fat

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It's true after all: If you want to be less fat, eat less fat

And it's got nothing to do with your genes. It's just that the more fat you eat, the less you can taste it in food

Journalist

The more fat you eat, the less you can taste it – and the more you want.
A researcher at Australian-based Deakin University,  Professor Russell Keast, who looks at how taste affects food consumption, used 44 sets of adult twins to see whether genes or diets affected their perception of fat.
His newly published research builds on his previous research that looks at taste and how this affects food choices and weight gain.
His theory is that people who do not taste fat in food are more likely to overeat.
Previous research by Keast and his PhD students showed people on a low-fat diet detected fat more easily than those on a higher-fat but calorie-controlled diet.
But what if genes played a role, asked Keast? He found 44 sets of adult twins to help with his latest research.
Half the twins were put on an eight-week low-fat diet. The other half were put on a high-fat diet. At the end of month one and month two, the participants were given three cups of liquid and asked which contained fat.
Those on the low-fat diet found it easier to identify fat in food. Their twin eating a lot of fat needed more fluids to be able to detect it.
His conclusion was that diet, not genes, influenced the perception of fat levels in food. The new study is published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  
This means that a person can change his or her sensory perception (taste) by changing his or her diet.

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