This guy rules: Life Esidimeni judge pays it forward

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This guy rules: Life Esidimeni judge pays it forward

UWC the first to benefit as former deputy chief justice donates his arbitrator's fees to varsity law schools

JacquelineFlynn

Last month, former deputy chief justice Dikgang Moseneke pledged to donate all of his arbitrator’s fees from the Life Esidimeni case to South African law schools.
And he kept his promise when, this week, the University of the Western Cape became the first recipient.
The R400,000 donation will be used to promote excellence in the law faculty.
“Hopefully, the donations will form the nucleus of a fuller and more ambitious project to restore hard work and excellence among law students as we hope to breed future leaders of the law academy and the judiciary,”  Moseneke told Times Select.He said he chose UWC because of the faculty’s contribution to the liberation struggle and because of the number of judges, advocates and lawyers the  university had produced who had made their mark.
“I hope to encourage young people from the Western Cape in particular to assume their role in continuing to be socially conscious lawyers, who will continue to uphold the rule of law and social justice.”
The judge and UWC rector Professor Tyrone Pretorius attended a ceremony at the university on Monday. “We are humbled by Judge Moseneke’s generosity and will ensure that his gift is used in the most appropriate way,” said Pretorius.
Moseneke served as the arbitrator in the hearings into the 2016 Life Esidimeni tragedy, in which 144 mental health patients died.The judge is expected to make a similar donation to the University of Limpopo law school, and indicated he would also reach out to the University of Venda.When Moseneke was 15 he was convicted of  participating in anti-apartheid activities. While in jail on Robben Island he obtained several degrees through Unisa.
In 1978 he was admitted as an attorney and in 2001 was appointed a justice of the Constitutional Court.
“The target of this is excellence; it is not a bursary. This is an attempt to identify and encourage excellence – hard work and commitment to achieve outstanding results‚” Moseneke was quoted as saying.

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