Bestsellers prove that fact is stronger than fiction

Lifestyle

Bestsellers prove that fact is stronger than fiction

Non-fiction leads the way on the SA book charts

Jennifer Platt

Non-fiction is still selling way more than fiction. The President’s Keepers is still in the top 10, Wilbur Smith’s memoir is a fan favourite, and Mandy Wiener’s new revelations about the state of crime is disturbing and eye-opening. In fiction, self-publishing phenomenon Dudu Busane Dube took on the challenge of writing a book based on a film.On Leopard Rock: A Life of Adventures, Wilbur Smith (Zaffre Publishing, R295)
Every time the novelist puts pen to paper to tell a story it becomes a bestseller and it’s the same with his memoir. Fans will be happy as Smith recounts his life, from his first hunt with his dad to how he worked to become one of the world’s favourite authors.Ministry of Crime, Mandy Wiener (Pan Macmillan, R295)
Prepare yourself. Wiener opens the backdoor to the world of superskelms: from the death of Brett Kebble to mob boss Radovan Krejcir’s reign and, even more scarily, what is happening now. Wiener says: “Ministry of Crime intends to examine how organised crime, gangsters and powerful political figures have been able to capture the law enforcement authorities and agencies.”Zulu Wedding, Dudu Busane Dube (Hlomu Publishing, R277)
The popular writer is one of the few self-published authors who has had phenomenal success in South Africa – she has sold thousands of her popular Hlomu series, which have become bestsellers. Dube’s latest is a standalone based on the movie The Zulu Wedding. She was asked by the the film’s director Lineo Sekeleoane to write a book that would take the film into new territory.Born a Crime, Trevor Noah (Pan Macmillan, R180)
The comedian’s memoir about his childhood is a firm favourite. And still selling. Testimony to Noah’s popularity and his poignant story of growing up in the twilight of apartheid.The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck, Mark Manson (HarperOne, R250)
A New York Times bestseller, this self-help book has sold over three million copies. Manson says in an interview on the Daily Stoic about one of the sections in his book: “The ‘Do Something’ Principle from the chapter about failure has also been a hit with readers since even before the book. It’s a handy little trick to help people get through emotional resistance and procrastination. Hell, if I was a cool kid, I might even call it a ‘life hack’.”491 Days, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela (Picador Africa, R190)
Consisting of letters and journals written by Madikizela-Mandela in her 491 days of solitary confinement during her incarceration which began in 1969.The Land Is Ours, Tembeka Ngcukaitobi (Penguin, R280)
Timely title. However Ngcukaitobi’s book deals not so much with the situation now but with South Africa’s first black lawyers in the 19th and early 20th century who had to deal with colonial expansion, land dispossession and forced labour.5 Ingredients: Quick & Easy Food, Jamie Oliver (Michael Joseph, R430)
One of the naked chef’s most popular cookbooks, 5 Ingredients is said to be filled with the easiest recipes to follow. There are 130 new dishes to try out like the Sticky Kinkin’ Wings, Chicken Pie, Mushroom Pasta, and delicious desserts like Speedy Steamed Pudding Pots.The Tattooist of Auschwitz, Heather Morris (Zaffre Publishing, R270)
Based on a true story. In Auschwitz, Lale Sokolov was the “Tatowierer”, the person responsible for marking his fellow prisoners with numbers when they entered the death camp. He meets and falls in love with Gita, a person he was marking, and promises her that one day they will leave the camp and be together.The President’s Keepers, Jacques Pauw (Tafelberg, R285)
Pauw’s book has sold over 197,000 copies, which makes it one of the biggest selling books in South Africa.

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