Africa’s nurses have cured their calling of Nightingale’s racist ...

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Africa’s nurses have cured their calling of Nightingale’s racist legacy

They have adapted colonial methods to meet local needs, making their Covid-19 fight far more effective

The Conversation

This year marks the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth. It’s therefore understandable that it’s being marked as the year of the nurse and midwife (https://www.who.int/campaigns/year-of-the-nurse-and-the-midwife-2020).

Nightingale is best known (https://www.britannica.com/biography/Florence-Nightingale) for her pioneering spirit and fearless approach to changing atrocious conditions and improving health-care service delivery. These qualities still characterise the attitudes and habits of nurses around the world. They are often the only front-line health-care workers caring for people, whether they are vulnerable and living in poor and isolated settings or well-off in rich parts of the world.

But Nightingale left two legacies. The other is less known...

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