Monday, October 14 2019

THE BIG ISSUES

LEADING THE AGENDA

Ideas FREE

Fear not, SA, the state capture rogues are finally landing in the Dudu

FREE TO READ | Zuma and son, Myeni, Gumede, the Guptas ... the net is falling around very dodgy people

4 min read

Zuma’s Stalingrad tactic has backfired, and it’ll cost him more than money

The former president has effectively built the walls of a legal prison he cannot escape from

Karyn Maughan
Journalist
4 min read
Sport FREE

How Typhoon Hagibis revealed everything that’s wrong with World Rugby

FREE TO READ | Its ‘robust contingency plans’ mean the likes of Namibia and Canada lose out on a shot at a win

Liam Del Carme
Journalist
2 min read

SMART NEWS

IN ONE TAKE

News FREE

Medaid madness: This is how they splash your cash

FREE TO READ | I slogged through the Council for Medical Schemes’ annual report, and what I found was shocking

Wendy Knowler
Consumer journalist
4 min read

Barbed ire: Politician locked out of his own property in Stellenbosch

Pierre Gerber turned to the high court to regain access to his land after it was fenced off

Bobby Jordan
Journalist
3 min read

Diwali without fireworks? It’s ‘very pro-Hindu’, says activist

Many Hindus in SA and across the globe are making a conscious decision to opt for eco-friendly celebrations

Nivashni Nair
Journalist
3 min read

Pay attention: you don’t have to be old to have a stroke

Stroke survivors, as young as 17, have joined the Angels Initiative to educate SA children about the condition

3 min read

May I have a minute of your time? It’s this very short film

The One-Minute Film Festival learned a few things from social media: a mere 60 seconds is good enough

3 min read

IDEAS

FEEDING YOUR MIND

They wrote it this week: Sodom and some horror, and Masekela’s magic

Extracts from diaries and letters written between October 14 and October 20

Robin Crouch
Journalist
7 min read

New saint could spark Catholic reform - but not after an unholy row

As John Henry Newman is canonised, debate rages between liberals and conservatives over the church's future

By Tim Stanley
4 min read

March of madness: Extinction Rebellion is a primal death cult

Their real agenda is to destroy industrial capitalism and reduce the world to a state of pre-industrial destitution

By Ross Clark
2 min read

SNAPSHOT

People's Party of Canada leader Maxime Bernier arrives for a French-language federal election debate at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Quebec.
MÉNAGE À TROIS People's Party of Canada leader Maxime Bernier arrives for a French-language federal election debate at the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Quebec.
Image: Reuters/Stephane Mahe

Six things about SA you need to know

Whale washes up at Umhlanga

Swimming has been barred at Umhlanga beach in Durban after a dead humpback whale washed up on the beach. Metro police director Steve Edwards said the whale was spotted at around 6am on Sunday. Edwards said the youngish whale washed up about a 100m from the lighthouse at the beach. "Sometimes when they get sick, they make their way to shore because for them to breath they need to be moving." Edwards said the carcass had not been removed yet. "They will either try and tow it back out to sea and leave it or they will cut it into pieces and remove it."

Fodder bound for drought-stricken E Cape

The Gift of the Givers is expected to deliver eight truckloads of fodder to the drought-stricken town of Graaff-Reinet in the Eastern Cape this week. “The request for fodder amongst emerging and commercial farmers is overwhelming, desperation in their eyes, a deep compassion to feed hungry and dying animals,” Gift of the Givers founder Imtiaz Sooliman said. Sooliman said they will deliver the fodder on Tuesday. At the beginning of the month Gift of the Givers provided drilling machines and water tankers. Hydrologist Dr Gideon Groenewald had also been sent to the area and will oversee the drilling of our eight boreholes in the town. According to Sooliman the first five boreholes have yielded 102,000 litres per day. Bottled water, water tankers and nutritional supplies would also be delivered for children.

KZN councillor dies in hail of bullets

KwaZulu-Natal councillor Khaya Sithole has been gunned down in full view of his constituents. The shooting occurred shortly after a council event on Thursday evening. "Preliminary information indicates that the slain councillor was participating in a municipal event when unknown assailants fired a hail of bullets at him," said KZN MEC for cooperative governance and traditional affairs Sipho Hlomuka. He "was gunned down in full glare of the public". Offering condolences to Sithole's family and constituents, Hlomuka said: "We are saddened to learn that the councillor was murdered with his boots on while working to advance the course of service to his community." Hlomuka urged law enforcement agencies to "leave no stone unturned in apprehending the perpetrators of this crime and in bringing them to justice speedily".

Live bombs found in at Uitenhage dam

Three live mortar bombs were found in the Strelitzia dam in Uitenhage over the weekend, Eastern Cape police said on Sunday. Capt Gerda Swart said the first two mortars were discovered by two elderly people on Friday. Swart said they transported them without realising that they were live mortars and could have detonated at any moment. The bomb squad from Port Elizabeth had to deactivate the mortars. On Sunday, a man who was fishing at the dam found the third live mortar. "The man also unknowingly handled it. Fortunately, he notified the police and the bomb disposal unit was immediately summoned to the scene and took possession [of the mortar]. "The dam levels have fallen over the last few months and it is believed that this could be the reason for the recent discoveries," Swart said. Police have warned residents not to handle or pick up anything that resembles a mortar.

SA man has 10 wives, two more have 9

There are 342,809 registered customary marriages on the National Population Register so far, home affairs minister Aaron Motsoaledi has disclosed. Registered customary marriages are regarded by the law as being "in community of property". SA's Customary Marriage Act, introduced in November 2000, also recognises polygamy – which means that a husband can register a number of wives. The minister has extended the period of registration for customary marriages entered into before and after commencement of the Act until end-June 2024. So far, the majority of customary marriages, 333,387, are registered with one spouse, said Motsoaledi. Another 8,410 are registered with two spouses. Marriages registered with three to nine spouses range from 814 to two. One is registered with 10 spouses.

Body of student found burnt

The University of KwaZulu-Natal has identified a student whose body was found burning in a bush on Saturday morning as 24-year-old Samkelo Zondi. It is believed the BComm student was allegedly killed by his roommate. The institution said the student's badly burnt body was found in a rugby field near the Westville campus. "Risk Management Services apprehended a suspect and handed him over to the South African Police Services," UKZN spokesperson Ashton Bodrick said. "The suspect is also a student at UKZN. Early reports state that the victim and accused were acquainted." It is alleged that security personnel saw smoke and the suspect coming out of the bush. Upon investigation, they found Zondi's body. " We appeal to anyone with information to come forward and assist in this investigation," Brodrick said.

THE VISUAL SIDE

The world celebrated as Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge broke the two-hour marathon barrier on Saturday. Despite the feat, Kipchoge's record will not be recognised by the sport's governing body as it took place outside open competition, with the use of in-and-out pacemakers.


CROSSWORDS

GIVE YOUR BRAIN SOME EXERCISE

Today’s cryptic crossword

It's time to put your brain to work

1 min read

Today’s quick crossword

How fast can you get it done?

1 min read

WORLD

THE NEWS YOU DON'T NORMALLY GET TO HEAR

Brides from hell: the camp where jihadi wives have taken over

Outnumbered guards are hapless as the murderous women enforce hardline Islamic law

By Josie Ensor
4 min read

Impeach Trump? There’s chance, says Rudy Guiliani

But president’s lawyer is adept at sidestepping questions about his Biden allegations and the Ukraine question

By Ben Riley Smith
5 min read

Hark! Is that the sound of the Brexit penny dropping for the UK?

Signs of progress come after Angela Merkel quietly disabused Boris Johnson on the Irish customs border question

By Peter Foster
3 min read

Where there’s a Wills: I’ll do my best stepping into dad’s shoes

As he prepares to make his own mark on father’s rich legacy, he admits he’ll ‘never know as much as he does’

By Hannah Furness
5 min read

SNAPSHOT

Young visitors play on Main Street in Hong Kong Disneyland amid protests that have gripped the Chinese-ruled city for nearly four months.
ESCAPE BUBBLES Young visitors play on Main Street in Hong Kong Disneyland amid protests that have gripped the Chinese-ruled city for nearly four months.
Image: Reuters/Susana Vera

6 things you need to know about the world

Tight security for Cambridges in Pakistan

More than 1,000 police will watch over the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in Pakistan this week for a visit the country hopes will dispel its image as a terrorist haven blighted by violence. The amount of security is unprecedented for a trip by the couple. Pakistani officials said their five-day itinerary was being kept tightly under wraps by the military, with local media only being given details at the last minute. – Telegraph Media Group Limited (2019)

Coral reefs threatened by cruise ship docks

It is one of Britain’s most prized coral reefs, sitting off the Cayman Islands and praised by the Prince of Wales as a “shining example” of a Commonwealth nation protecting its marine life. But 15 acres of reef could be destroyed to make way for two cruise ship docks. Campaigners say the George Town Harbour project will result in 22 acres of seabed being dredged and two deep water piers constructed to allow marine life to move underneath. In December, the islands' first publicly initiated referendum will decide the reef's future. – Telegraph Media Group Limitede (2019)

Mad fan used pop star’s eyes to stalk her

Police have arrested a man suspected of assaulting a young Japanese pop star after he located her neighbourhood by enlarging the reflection in her eyes from social media photos. Hibiki Sato, 26, was arrested on a charge of causing injury by forcible indecency to Ena Matsuoka, 21. Police suspect Sato was able to narrow down the area in Tokyo where Matsuoka lived by going through her social media photos, enlarging them to reveal scenery and landmarks reflected in her eyes. He is alleged to have molested her as she entered her block of flats, allegedly placing a towel over her head, throwing her to the ground and groping her. – Telegraph Media Group Limited

Is Amazon spying on customers’ CCTV?

Amazon has been accused of watching footage from its customers’ CCTV cameras in a move likely to reignite concerns over whether the US tech giant is violating people's privacy. Amazon’s Cloud Cam devices, which are only currently available in the US, record and stream video whenever they detect motion, and can be used by people for security purposes as well as pet monitors. Clips from the cameras have also reportedly been sent to Amazon workers in India and Romania. – Telegraph Media Group Limited (2019)

Lady Liberty reaches new peak of fame

Pro-democracy protesters hauled a four-metre statue known as Lady Liberty to the top of a famous Hong Kong mountain early on Sunday, announcing the peak would be its “final resting place”. The statue has been a regular feature at larger, more peaceful rallies, eliciting cheers when it was wheeled in by volunteers and transported around the city on the back of a truck. But on Sunday organisers said Lady Liberty had made her final journey as they unveiled her at the top of Lion Rock, a 495m peak overlooking a forest of skyscrapers. - AFP

Plastic saves endangered puffins

The cliffs of the Calf of Man appear abundant with puffins, a species threatened with global extinction, but upon closer inspection the seabirds are not all that they seem. Over 100 decoy puffin statues, purchased from a garden centre, have been placed on the 600-acre island off the southern tip of the Isle of Man in an attempt to draw the real thing back to the island. Experts say the plan could be working, after puffins were spotted landing on the island for the first time in decades. The island was abandoned by the puffins after a killer rat invasion, which would eat the birds eggs and chicks. – Telegraph Media Group Limited (2019)

THE BUSINESS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Tito’s budget needs to give SA a dose of bitter medicine

The scale of fiscal challenges, within the budget itself and at loss-making SOEs, argues for bold measures now

By Peter Worthington
7 min read

Still no promised state money, now Job Creation Trust is on the brink

The company’s creditors have filed for its liquidation, as 300 people face losing their livelihoods

By Bekezela Phakathi
2 min read

Lights, camera and urgent action needed for creative economy

The ‘Generations 16’ debacle exposed the need for a dialogue where all can place their cards on the table

By Ayabonga Cawe
3 min read

LIFESTYLE

CULTURE COMES ALIVE

Crash decision: How do we feel about self-driving cars?

From the suspicious driver to the tech-savvy passenger, not everyone is sold on the idea of autonomous driving

By Motoring reporters
2 min read

RU4 4IR? Then come see the future in Kyalami this week

Annual summit on how artificial intelligence, robotics and digital biology can solve global challenges

By Sanet Oberholzer
1 min read

The burning issue: How you should be using sunscreen

Confused by what the numbers mean on your cream?

By Sanet Oberholzer
3 min read

SPORT

FINISH LINE ESSENTIALS

SPORTS DAY: Watch out Boks, here come the Blossoms

Your roundup of the sporting news of the day

Mninawa Ntloko
Sports editor
7 min read

Blast from the past: Habana runs wild

Today in SA sports history: October 14

David Isaacson
Journalist
1 min read