Tuesday, May 14 2019

THE BIG ISSUES

LEADING THE AGENDA

The ‘new South Africa’ is dead. Here’s to a new ‘new SA’

We need a new South Africa more than ever, and I don’t mean the Rainbow Nation myth

Tom Eaton
Columnist
4 min read

ANC to stick to gender premier split - but what about Cyril’s men?

Analysts predicted a 50/50 split but the ANC ended up appointing seven male premiers

Mpumzi Zuzile
Journalist
3 min read

Gran, 87, among dead in E Cape Turnbull crash

Taxi passenger describes horrific scene after seeing assault accused’s Jaguar speed past moments before

By John Harvey
5 min read

Satanic murder accused: ‘I am very sorry’

The youngest accused in the Krugersdorp murder trial addresses the family of those she had help to kill

By Iavan Pijoos and Ernest Mabuza
5 min read

SMART NEWS

IN ONE TAKE

Governor who fired black teacher calls it quits

Now parents at the Cape Town school are calling for a transformation-friendly replacement for Gavin Downard

3 min read

Parent threatens to take online school application fight to court

Gauteng parents say language preference is ignored, and that the system is 'inconsistent' with the law

3 min read

‘Drunk’ driver who killed three has sentence slashed

Durban man has his term cut from 20 years to six because the state 'had failed to discharge the onus of proof'

Shain Germaner
Journalist
3 min read

Not licked yet: fight over Chicken Licken ad ban rages on

Now lawyers argue the ad is not about colonialism, and besides, the law and Constitution would allow it even if it were

4 min read

Engineer tails cheetahs for the human body’s secrets

South African engineer builds on robotics research to develop a new model for athletes, doctors and others

Tanya Farber
Journalist
3 min read

IDEAS

FEEDING YOUR MIND

Think the China-US trade war will take days to fix? Think again

It was always ridiculous to expect it to be wrapped up quickly - here are are the three reasons for that

By Matthew Lynn
4 min read

Shut up and hit the road: advice for outgoing chief execs

The last thing your successor needs is the CEO’s ghost hanging around, pining for the past

By Andrew Hill
4 min read

Butt out! In Greece, smoking is alive and kicking despite bans

Anti-smoking laws in Greece date back to the mid-19th century - but the backlash is huge

By AFP
3 min read

SNAPSHOT

The Angel de la Independencia monument during high levels of pollution in Mexico City.
ANGEL OF SMARTPHONE DEPENDENCE The Angel de la Independencia monument during high levels of pollution in Mexico City.
Image: Reuters/Carlos Jasso

Six things about SA you need to know

‘Fraud’ probe at lotteries commission

An investigation has been launched into the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) following allegations of fraud and corruption involving grant allocations to "good causes". According to GroundUp, the investigation by the department of trade and industry (DTI) follows reports over the past 18 months describing alleged fraud and corruption involving lottery grants running into hundreds of millions of rands. The commission is an agency of the DTI. "The minister has instructed the National Lotteries Commission board and DTI's internal audit department to institute an investigation," DTI spokesperson Sidwell Medupe said on WhatsApp. The investigation began "a few weeks ago … at least a month", according to Moosa Ebrahim, chief of staff in the office of trade and ministry minister Rob Davies.

Athletics SA to appeal Caster decision

Sports minister Tokozile Xasa has instructed Athletics South Africa (ASA) to appeal the Court of Arbitration for Sport decision against Caster Semenya. The ministry said on Monday that the move follows the advice by a high-level panel that met to discuss the way forward after CAS ruled that the IAAF could impose its female eligibility regulations. Under the rules, differences of sex development (DSD) athletes with male XY chromosomes must take medication to lower naturally occurring high levels of testosterone to compete in women’s races from 400m to a mile. Apart from the pole vault and 400m hurdles‚ the events cover the races that Semenya specialises in. The appeal must be lodged at the Swiss Federal Tribunal before the end of the month. It is believed the appeal process could take six months to be heard and decided‚ which would be too late for the world championships in Doha from September 28.

Angler all at sea as fish drags him into ocean

A KwaZulu-Natal angler who was fishing from his kayak on the south coast ran into trouble after a fish he hooked dragged him further into the ocean on Sunday. Kevin Fourie, National Sea Rescue Institute station commander at Rocky Bay, said a paddle-skier arrived at the rescue station on Sunday morning to report that his friend, who was on a fishing kayak, was in distress near Kelso beach. A team was dispatched and the fisherman was found a few kilometres away with his kayak "semi-submerged". "He reported that he launched at 6am to go fishing and hooked a fish which dragged him further out to sea,” Fourie said. The man was uninjured.

Bus passenger bust with tik worth R2m

A woman trying to enter SA on a bus via Beitbridge was stopped in her tracks when customs officers found purses full of drugs in her luggage. The traveller, who arrived at the port of entry with two suitcases in the early hours of Sunday, was asked to put her possessions through the customs baggage inspection area. "Upon physical inspection, an off-white, crystal-like substance concealed in multiple colourfully decorated purses with plastics was found containing substances that reacted positive to tests," the SA Revenue Service said on Monday. The luggage was found to contain a large stash of crystal methamphetamine (tik) worth about R2m. "Preliminary investigations indicated that the traveller had flown from abroad into a neighbouring country and tried to enter South Africa by bus through Beitbridge. Local police have since handed over the matter to the Hawks,” said Sars.

Ambulance kills three while trying to avoid taxi

Police are investigating a case of culpable homicide after three pedestrians died and a fourth was injured when an ambulance ploughed into them on Monday. Police spokesperson Colonel Thembeka Mbele said the driver of a Rescue Care ambulance had tried to avoid hitting a taxi which had stopped suddenly in the middle of the road. The incident occurred on Booth Road in Cato Manor, Durban. "The ambulance driver tried to avoid colliding with the taxi, but he struck four pedestrians on the side of the road. One pedestrian, believed to be 28 years old, died at the scene while three were taken to hospital. "Two of the pedestrians later passed away," Mbele said. Garrith Jamieson of Rescue Care extended the service’s condolences to family and friends of the deceased. "We will be working closely with the police and helping wherever possible in their investigations."

Hlaudi's ACM fumes over ‘drunk voter’ video

The African Content Movement (ACM) is livid with the IEC, accusing its officials of filming a "drunk voter" in a video that has gone viral. The filming of the video was one of the reasons the party said it would be heading to court. This is according to ACM secretary-general Romeo Ramuada, who said the party would meet other small parties over fresh court action to vent their grievances. The video shows a man staggering as he votes, as people are heard laughing and commenting in the background. About 27 small parties initially threatened to go to court to interdict the IEC from declaring the results. But they seemingly abandoned that move at the 11th hour, allowing the commission to proceed. Ramuada said they pulled back out of respect for the people who voted for other parties, "because we do not have a problem with the other parties - but we have a problem with the IEC". Ramuada said the small parties would meet in Johannesburg this week to consolidate their grievances and launch the court action.

THE VISUAL SIDE


CROSSWORDS

GIVE YOUR BRAIN SOME EXERCISE

Today’s cryptic crossword

It's time to put your brain to work

1 min read

Today’s quick crossword

How fast can you get it done?

1 min read

WORLD

THE NEWS YOU DON'T NORMALLY GET TO HEAR

Skrik vir Nxivm: sex cult gave leader god status, says witness

Recruits weren’t allowed near the leader, but when they were it ‘was a little like you were seeing some kind of god’

By Joseph Ax and Brendan Pierson
2 min read

Either it’s justice, or hacker’s trial will make you WannaCry

The 22-year-old hero did what the world’s top cyber experts couldn’t and ended up in the FBI’s sights

By Cara McGoogan
6 min read

No small matter: minute remains of Nazi victims buried

Tissue samples found on microscopic glass plates are rare concrete proof that prisoners’ bodies were sent for dissection

By AFP
3 min read

Drown and out: tense climate as islanders take Oz to the UN

The landmark complaint could be the first time climate change inaction is seen as a human rights violation

By AFP
2 min read

SNAPSHOT

Newly ordained priests lie on the floor as Pope Francis leads a mass in Saint Peter's Basilica.
THE LIE-IN KINGS Newly ordained priests lie on the floor as Pope Francis leads a mass in Saint Peter's Basilica.
Image: Giuseppe Lami/Pool via Reuters

6 things you need to know about the world

Modi’s tech head in the clouds …

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has been roundly mocked for suggesting that radars are affected by clouds and boasting that he sent an e-mail attachment years before the technology was invented. Modi, who is fighting to retain his premiership in a marathon election, claimed in a weekend television interview that he ordered air strikes on Pakistan in February because cloud cover would stop radar detection of Indian fighter jets. "I said there is so much cloud and rain. There is a benefit," Modi told News Nation, recounting the bombardment of what India claims was a militant training camp across the Pakistani border. "(I thought) the clouds can benefit us too. We can escape the radar … Ultimately I said there are clouds, let's go," he added. – AFP

… but his lookalike’s a big hit

His white beard neatly trimmed and a sleeveless jacket thrown over his traditional Indian shirt, Abhinandan Pathak turns heads thanks to an uncanny resemblance to the country's Prime Minister Narendra Modi. But Pathak - almost the same height and build as the PM, and who even walks in a similar way - is no ordinary doppelganger. Bitter at Modi's "failed promises", Pathak is running as an independent against Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party in India's election - and is getting a lot of support. "The anger (towards Modi) is real. I can feel it wherever I go," Pathak, 58, said from his one-room shanty in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh. When Modi was first elected in 2014, Pathak was a supporter. Because of his resemblance to the premier, people "adored me, they asked for selfies and hugged me." "I was showered with love … but now they get angry when they see me. – AFP

One shell of a rice forecast

In an ancient ceremony that occurs only once every imperial era, Japanese palace courtiers decided on Monday where best to grow royal rice - using shells from endangered turtles. Two thin plates made from turtle shells were heated over a flame to produce cracks, then used to determine where rice should be grown. The ceremony was presided over by new emperor Naruhito. The cracks "told" officials to grow the rice in the ancient capital of Kyoto and north of Tokyo in Tochigi prefecture. For the ceremony - which Naruhito did not attend - officials in long black robes and ornate black hats walked slowly into a striped tent. The rare ritual is conducted only after a new emperor takes the throne. While the shells are harvested from rare green sea turtles, they are procured as part of a conservation scheme, officials said. – AFP

Women harder hit by death of friends

Men bounce back more quickly than women after the death of a friend because they are less close to them, a study has found. The first long-term analysis of those bereaved by the loss of a close friend found women suffer more emotionally and socially, and are more likely to endure mental health problems than men. It takes women longer to recover because they share tighter "socio-emotional" bonds, the study of 9,586 people found. The effects can be felt for up to four years. – © Telegraph Media Group Limited (2019)

Paris ‘too ugly’ for my girl, director claims

The director of Amélie, the hit film which became a global ode to Paris, says he wouldn't make a sequel because the City of Lights has become "ugly now" due to constant "construction sites everywhere". Jean-Pierre Jouyet's whimsical urban fairytale about a young woman's quest for love in an idealised depiction of Montmartre is among the biggest international box office successes for a French-language film yet. In the feel-good tale, a shy waitress, played by Audrey Tautou, strives to change the lives of those around her for the better while struggling with her own isolation. In an interview with IndieWire, Jouyet said he had repeatedly fended off requests for an Amélie sequel or spin-off series: "In Paris now it's so difficult to shoot because there are construction sites everywhere, so Paris is ugly now. So, no, I don't want to make a sequel or even a series." – © Telegraph Media Group Limited (2019)

Iceman Putin falls flat on his face

Kremlin chief Vladimir Putin praised "hockey diplomacy" as he scored nine goals in a game with his allies and Russian stars but fell on his face after the match. The Russian president took to the ice for an exhibition game at the Bolshoi Ice Arena in the Black Sea resort of Sochi. The sports-mad 66-year-old leader, who has done a lot to promote a healthy lifestyle in Russia, said he could not even stand on ice several years ago and learnt to skate by clutching a chair. Skating alongside ministers and hockey stars, Putin scored nine goals, leading his team to a 14-7 win in the gala match of the Night Hockey League, the Kremlin said. The opposing side was made up of prominent amateurs. After the match Putin took a victory lap to greet the cheering crowd but fell on his face after apparently tripping over a red carpet on the rink. He was unhurt. - AFP

THE BUSINESS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Ch-ch-ch-ch-changes ...Turn and face the strange

We have to be bold enough to write off the past – all of it – because there’s no price for secondhand strategies

By Mark Barnes
4 min read

MultiChoice: More news is good news, but cash is tight

Newzroom Afrika joins pay-TV operator's portfolio of news channels, all battling with reduced adspend

By Mudiwa Gavaza
1 min read

Trust us, there’s a great deal going on in secondhand cars

Peer-to-peer vehicle finance venture by RCS joins a busy field dominated by AutoTrader and WeBuyCars

By Londiwe Buthelezi
1 min read

LIFESTYLE

CULTURE COMES ALIVE

Twas brillig and the chill set in: Oh, for a book and blanket

Murder, bush lore, robots, and redemption. Cuddle up under the covers with these enthralling new books

By Michele Magwood
3 min read

Bookmarks: Mom lied, there’s a monster under your bed

A fortnightly look at books, writers and reviews

By Andrew Donaldson
8 min read

If you were stuck at the South Pole, what would you read?

Holed up in a tiny cave for seven months, explorers stayed sane with ‘David Copperfield’ by Charles Dickens

By Lucy Davies
6 min read

SPORT

FINISH LINE ESSENTIALS

SPORTS DAY: Manyonga flags Shanghai meet for more gold

Your roundup of the sporting news of the day

David Isaacson
Journalist
5 min read

Tahir vs Rabada: What a juicy rivalry (not forgetting Steyn)

Key members of SA’s attack join forces at the World Cup in England, which starts in less than three weeks

Telford Vice
Journalist
3 min read