Friday, September 28 2018

THE BIG ISSUES

LEADING THE AGENDA

Inside the hellfire: If you didn't have a cellphone, you died

A firefighter who rushed to save his colleagues tells us about the horror inside Joburg's fatal September 5 fire

Naledi Shange
Journalist
2 min read

Now the Americans have Guptas in their sights

Whistleblowers working with US agencies probing shady use of the dollar, lawyer tells Zondo inquiry

Ranjeni Munusamy
Associate editor: analysis
4 min read

Gupta e-mails are in Zondo’s court. Then, hopefully, it’s Hawks’ turn

The Hawks will have access to a treasure trove of 200,000 e-mails if state capture probe admits them as evidence

Karyn Maughan
Journalist
3 min read

SMART NEWS

IN ONE TAKE

Slippery SARS official frustrates Nugent panel

Moyane sidekick dodges questions on 'purge' of deputy commissioner Ivan Pillay and whether 'rogue unit' was unlawful

Amil Umraw
Journalist
4 min read

We will stand and fight, foreigners vow

Ethiopian spaza owners vow to protect what little they have left after locals go on violent looting spree in Cape town

Aron Hyman
Journalist
2 min read

Ela Gandhi: 'We need to change the way we view each other'

Mahatma Ghandi's granddaughter speaks out at an academic dialogue about racial tension in KZN

Lwandile Bhengu
Journalist
4 min read

They guide us through traffic. Now their jobs are caught in a contract jam

Joburg's 'team in green' faces a bleak future. We meet the real people behind the uniforms

Alex Patrick
Journalist
4 min read

Giving up on life can literally kill you within days

It's not suicide, it's not depression – it's simply the will to die, new study reveals

Claire Keeton
Journalist
3 min read

Smoking tik makes a hell of a meth of your mouth

Cape Town clinic uncovers a dental disaster among methamphetamine addicts

Dave Chambers
Cape Town bureau chief
3 min read

IDEAS

TO FEED YOUR MIND

Rest in peace and queues

A visit to Lenin’s tomb got me thinking about final resting places

5 min read

The bully the Bard loved is not the brute we have a beef with

A column to satisfy your inner grammar nerd

Sue de Groot
Journalist
3 min read

UNacceptable: The UN needs to get real about saving the oppressed

Lest we risk a strategic and moral failure, accountability must be at the centre of efforts to resolve conflicts

By William Hague and Angelina Jolie
5 min read

CROSSWORDS

GIVE YOUR BRAIN SOME EXERCISE

Today's cryptic crossword

It's time to put your brain to work

1 min read

Today's quick crossword

How fast can you get it done?

1 min read

SNAPSHOT

Hugh Masekela’s daughter Motlalepula Twala listens to some of the interactive installations at the 'No Borders' Exhibition at the Sandton Convention Centre. The exhibition celebrates the life of Masekela who died in January.
colourful life Hugh Masekela’s daughter Motlalepula Twala listens to some of the interactive installations at the 'No Borders' Exhibition at the Sandton Convention Centre. The exhibition celebrates the life of Masekela who died in January.
Image: Alaister Russell

Six things about SA you need to know

Archbishop Tutu back in hospital

Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu has been admitted to a Cape Town hospital for a series of tests. The archbishop was said to in good spirits after settling into his ward, and hoped to be back home in a few days. Tutu turns 87 in 10 days’ time.

Catastrophic fuel hike looms‚ protests expected

Brace yourself for another big fuel price hike. The Automobile Association (AA) warned on Thursday that motorists would face “unprecedented price increases” in October‚ based on unaudited month-end fuel price data released by the Central Energy Fund (CEF). These could be “catastrophic for road users", the AA said. With the rand and oil contributing almost equally to the rises‚ petrol is expected to be up by R1.01 per litre and diesel by R1.24. Illuminating paraffin users are also likely to be hit hard by an expected hike of around R1.05. Meanwhile, People Against Petrol and Paraffin Price Increases (Pappi) has warned of a “total shutdown” on Friday in Durban‚ in protest at the rising cost of fuel. They declined, however, to elaborate of what form the protest would take‚ saying details would be announced later.

Mining Charter will not make everyone happy

The new Mining Charter represents a consensus among stakeholders‚ but will not make everyone happy‚ mineral resources minister Gwede Mantashe said on Thursday morning. The highlights‚ as outlined by the minister‚ include a number of compromises related to the contentious aspect of ownership. The charter was approved by the cabinet last week and provides some long-awaited policy certainty for potential investors. The charter‚ which was set to be gazetted on Thursday‚ now states that a holder of an existing mining right who has already achieved a minimum 26% black shareholding will be deemed compliant‚ even if the empowerment partner has since exited. A new mining right must have a minimum 30% BEE shareholding. Mantashe said on Thursday that the charter was a product of a collective effort to ensure the sector was transformed. “It’s a product we can live with‚ [even if] it doesn’t make everybody or anybody happy.”

ConCourt: Bathabile Dlamini must cough up

Former social development minister Bathabile Dlamini has been found personally liable for 20% of the legal costs incurred by the Black Sash and Freedom under Law over the social grants fiasco. The finding was made by the Constitutional Court in a judgment handed down on Thursday. In a unanimous judgment‚ penned by Justice Johan Froneman‚ Dlamini was criticised for her role in handling the SA Social Security Agency (Sassa) debacle. The court ordered Dlamini to pay‚ in her personal capacity‚ 20% of the costs of Black Sash and Freedom Under Law‚ including the costs of two counsel. The court also directed that copies of the judgment and the findings of an inquiry headed by Judge Bernard Ngoepe – held to determine Dlamini's role in the social grants saga – be forwarded to the Director of Public Prosecutions to consider whether she lied under oath and should be prosecuted for perjury.

Police hunt for man who insulted Mabuza

Police are searching for a man who allegedly made "derogatory utterances" - widely shared on social media - about Deputy President David Mabuza in Mpumalanga. The insults were made on July 28 during a meeting at Embalenhle in Govan Mbeki Local Municipality. According to police, the man made the statements, which “have the potential to cause serious harm‚ impair the dignity and tarnish a person’s image” at the meeting. The utterances “bear elements of a crime”, said police spokesman Brigadier Leonard Hlathi. Following the airing of the video‚ Mabuza laid a case of crimen injuria at the Embalenhle police station. The person later defended his remarks‚ adding he would repeat them and that he was ready for court.

Train burnings halt King Shaka Day celebrations

The King Shaka Day celebrations, scheduled to take place at Durban’s Moses Mabhida Stadium on Saturday, have been postponed again following the suspension of train services by Metrorail in KwaZulu-Natal. Train services were suspended indefinitely by the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (Prasa) this week after Metrorail vehicles were set alight in Umlazi by commuters angered by trains being late. Metrorail staff were also locked in a building at a station in Umlazi by the angry commuters. The King Shaka Day celebrations were postponed a week following the death of Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini’s son‚ Prince Butho‚ after a long illness. IFP leader Mangosuthu Buthelezi said after consultations with the king‚ it was decided that the King Shaka Day celebrations should be postponed again as the suspension of train services would make it difficult for those who wanted to travel to Durban.

VISUAL SIDE


THE WORLD

The news you don't normally get to hear

Don Zuckerberg sends two more lieutenants to sleep with the fishes

Could the Facebook godfather's shows of strength prove his greatest weakness?

By Harry de Quetteville
5 min read

Russian to judgment: The nyet to gays is getting ever louder

Russia is trying to defend traditional values by deepening the brutality against its LGBT+ community

By Daria Litvinova
5 min read

Cancer patients get new hope from the humble aspirin

Survival rate is 20% to 30% greater, while spread of the disease was also reduced, study finds

By Sarah Knapton
2 min read

Sword or syphilis: now we know which killed Caravaggio

Temper-prone painter may have died of infected wound inflicted in a fight, scientists say

By Josephine McKenna
1 min read

SNAPSHOT

SIX THINGS ABOUT THE WORLD YOU NEED TO KNOW

Be gondola with you, boozy tourists

Venice is mulling a ban on carrying alcohol in the streets in its latest bid to combat the impact of excessive tourism and disruptive behaviour that is infuriating residents. The city is considering fines for anyone found to be carrying alcohol after 7pm – even if it is sealed in shopping bags. The move is designed to target drunk tourists who party throughout the night in squares or public places in the popular Lagoon City without a “justifiable reason”. Venice’s local police chief, Marco Agostini, said the proposal was not designed to target shoppers leaving their local supermarket but rather “someone who goes around drunk and has a bag with three bottles of beer inside”, ANSA news agency reported. More than 20 million tourists visit the historic centre of Venice every year but a growing number of residents are fleeing the city, leaving just 55,000 living there. – © The Daily Telegraph

No-go: Nintendo kills Super Mario street buzz

Nintendo says it has won a court battle against a popular go-kart operator that allows drivers to dress up as Super Mario and other game characters to zip through the streets of Japan. Visitors to Tokyo and other major Japanese cities are often stunned to see convoys of karts driven by people, usually tourists, dressed up as Mario, Yoshi, Princess Peach and other popular Nintendo characters buzzing around busy streets. Japan has no ban on people driving go-karts on public roads. But the court ruling looks set to bring such Nintendo-themed antics screaching to a halt. The gaming giant said the ruling blocks the “MariCAR” go-kart service from lending Mario and other characters’ costumes to its customers. Nintendo also complained that its popular racing game “Mario Kart” is known widely as “MariKar“, just like the go-kart service’s name. – AFP

Sex of the best: jail and a caning for prostitute

A religious court in a Malaysian state ruled by an Islamist party has ordered the jailing and caning of a woman who pleaded guilty to offering sexual services, a prosecutor said. The woman, sentenced under Islamic laws forbidding prostitution, will be the third to be caned in the conservative eastern state of Terengganu, ruled by the Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party, following similar punishments in the past month. “Even though the offence does not involve a victim, it has a negative impact by destroying societal institutions, introducing sexually transmitted diseases, and has a bad influence on the youth,” said prosecutor Muhammad Khasmizan Abdullah. The 30-year-old single mother, who was caught by Islamic enforcement officers at a hotel, had sought leniency, saying she turned to prostitution to raise her child and received no financial support from her former husband. – Reuters

These are your goat-to party animals

Spanky and Pippin are literally party animals in the Los Angeles nightlife scene. The Nigerian dwarf goats are professional party goers, bringing their special brand of magic to city celebrations and starry soirees. So-called goat mom Scout Raskin, a lifelong animal lover and former child actor, set up Party Goats LA in early 2017 and charges $99 an hour to bring her goats to a party or event. One of the most popular interactions with the goats at parties is to have them jump onto revellers’ backs while they kneel on all fours. The goats are unfazed by loud music and crowds of people, Raskin said. Before hitting the town, Raskin dresses the goats in purple, lace-cuffed velvet jackets and neckbands, and wraps their horns in brightly coloured tape, for decoration and safety. - Reuters

They aren’t having a slice of this Krafty change

Food giant Heinz has bowed to the "will of the people" and decided against changing the name of its Salad Cream to Sandwich Cream. Fans of the condiment made their outrage known in June when parent company Kraft Heinz announced that it was considering a name change for the first time in 104 years. Heinz said research had found that just 14% of consumers actually used the cream on salads. It said that most considered it to be an alternative to mayonnaise and pairing it with tuna, ham or cheese in sandwiches. However, a survey carried out by the company found that 87% of consumers wanted the product to remain as Salad Cream, rejecting other potential names such as Fish Finger Sauce, Chip Sauce and Roast Potato Sauce. – © The Daily Telegraph

What’s the deal with a third hand?

“The Apprentice” has been accused by fans of a “photoshop fail” after a male contestant appeared to have three hands in promotional pictures. Kayode Damil can be seen with his arms crossed in the shots for the new BBC series. However, eagle-eyed viewers spotted that his hand looked as though it had been split in two, appearing both underneath and above his folded arm, giving the impression of a third hand. Fans also noticed the London skyline normally seen behind the contestants had taken on a distinctly different form: Birmingham's Bullring shopping centre could be seen as well as Glasgow’s Clyde Arc and the steeple from Malta's St Paul's Pro-Cathedral. A BBC spokesperson said Damil’s arm had fallen prey to an odd lighting illusion, while the non-London additions were also part of the plan to reflect candidates participating in tasks around the UK and overseas. – © The Daily Telegraph
The wind catches Pope Francis' pellegrina at the Vatican.
THE POPE’S BURQA The wind catches Pope Francis' pellegrina at the Vatican.
Image: Tiziana Fabi/AFP

THE BUSINESS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Local content still key to coining it, says Blackstar

Investment in films and music for sale to global and local streaming platforms is central to diversify revenue

By Nick Hedley
2 min read

Something wrong about this crafty move to delist from JSE

Howden has not paid a dividend since 2013 despite its cash pile growing – at last count – to over R1.3bn

By Marc Hasenfuss
1 min read

Is Grand Parade burgering up the works with its board?

‘Activist’ shareholders want directors with more experience in rolling out Burger King franchise

By Marc Hasenfuss
1 min read

LIFESTYLE

CULTURE COMES ALIVE

Stereotypecast: Kevin Hart plays Kevin Hart all over again

The comedian is up to his old familiar antics

By Yolisa Mkele
3 min read

Won’t you take us to the bioscope?

The films opening in our cinemas this week

By Critics’ choice
2 min read

Directing Bond films leaves auteurs shaken, if not stirred

How each of the slew of directors since 1962 has lent their styles to the 24-strong franchise

By Tom Fordy
15 min read

SPORT

FINISH LINE ESSENTIALS

SPORTS DAY: Kolbe cracks the nod for wing on Saturday

Your roundup of the sporting news of the day

Bareng-Batho Kortjaas
Sunday Times sports editor
6 min read

Cheika mate? Oz coach bets big on getting flyhalf right

Wallabies have won just two of their seven Tests thus far this season, with the Boks in Port Elizabeth to come

Liam Del Carme
Journalist
2 min read

Blasts from the past: Welcome Ncita chows ‘Sugar Baby’

Today in SA sports history: September 28

David Isaacson
Journalist
1 min read