Thursday, August 23 2018

THE BIG STORIES

LEADING THE AGENDA

Analysis: ‘Charges might not stick to latest k-word twit’

Despite his obnoxious remarks, lawyers say there are serious obstacles to going the crimen injuria route

Katharine Child
Journalist
3 min read

How Tom Moyane turned crack investigators into paper pushers

For six months, once an executive in the customs unit, Sydwell Phokane would 'go to the office and do nothing'

Amil Umraw
Journalist
3 min read

Zim elections: Lawyers were there, but couldn’t speak

Advocates Dali Mpofu and Tembeka Ngcukaitobi did not have the required clearance to address the judges

By Ray Ndlovu
3 min read

SMART NEWS

IN ONE TAKE

School sports ban on pupil over ‘untameable’ mom

Principal calls mother unruly and unloving, governing body threatens to sue after she accuses rival school of bias

Dave Chambers
Cape Town bureau chief
5 min read

Harbouring anger: locals want in on boat action, or they’ll burn it down

There is a delay in the much-needed upgrade for the crumbling Hout Bay harbour

Bobby Jordan
Journalist
2 min read

Evicted families living on a prayer in Joburg’s Jerusalem

They occupied flats after waiting 22 years for housing - now they’ve been hounded into an informal settlement

Belinda Pheto
Journalist
3 min read

New heat maps show frontlines in war on TB

As lab data identifies communities with a high burden of drug-resistant TB, intervention becomes possible

Dave Chambers
Cape Town bureau chief
1 min read

Sex and sport: Winning men play a cheating game

Men who triumph on the pitch get a testosterone boost that makes them more likely to stray, a study has found

Suthentira Govender
Journalist
2 min read

IDEAS

TO FEED YOUR MIND

The subtle, destructive racism of white, English SA

English is the only language that can make you feel small without uttering a word. It's that look, that cold stare

Jonathan Jansen
Columnist
6 min read

Enough pigs killed in Spain to feed the country (and some)

Pork export boom to China triggers environmental concerns with 50 million animals killed every year

By James Badcock
2 min read

Does Jamie Oliver’s ‘stolen’ rice mean he’s ‘very white’?

We know the celebrity chef didn’t steal the recipe from a Jamaican chef since everything about his version is wrong

By Celia Walden
4 min read

CROSSWORDS

GIVE YOUR BRAIN SOME EXERCISE

Today's cryptic crossword

It's time to put your brain to work

1 min read

Today's quick crossword

How fast can you get it done?

1 min read

VISUAL SIDE

Residents of Ramaphosa informal settlement, near Reiger Park, took to the streets on Wednesday August 22 2018 in a service delivery protest, adamant that if the president doesn’t come to them they will continue with their protest.


SNAPSHOT

A pilgrim is blessed by the newly ordained Father Gerard Quirke after Mass at the summit of Croagh Patrick holy mountain during an annual Catholic pilgrimage near Lecanvey, Ireland.
The father and father A pilgrim is blessed by the newly ordained Father Gerard Quirke after Mass at the summit of Croagh Patrick holy mountain during an annual Catholic pilgrimage near Lecanvey, Ireland.
Image: Reuters/Clodagh Kilcoyne

Six things about SA you need to know

Good, flaky heavens! Snow on the way

A strong cold front is predicted to bring up to 15cm of snow to mountains in the Western Cape this weekend. The front will hit on Saturday, and snow is expected that afternoon across the Cape Fold mountain ranges stretching as far north as Clanwilliam. Snow is also expected over parts of the Karoo in the Northern Cape between Sutherland and Calvinia. South African Weather Service forecaster Kate Turner said freezing levels were expected as low as 1‚060m above sea level‚ meaning lower mountains slopes would also receive some snow. The snowfall is expected to continue throughout Saturday night and into Sunday morning.

Get paid to mind your own rubbish

In a bid to encourage residents to stop dumping refuse illegally, the Nelson Mandela Bay municipality wants to pay them to sort through their rubbish. The initiative, which is subject to budget approval, means residents would separate all their waste into piles of what is recyclable and not for collection by cooperatives. The initiative will be piloted in Missionvale and Matthew Goniwe before being rolled out to other areas after about six months. Presenting the plan to the public health portfolio committee on Tuesday, senior director Annalisa Dyakala said efforts to clean up the Bay’s townships were not yielding the desired outcomes. Dyakala said the aim was also to introduce and maintain a culture of separating waste in Bay households.

Trip to steal avocados ends in rape of granny

A teenager who raped a woman, 95, in Uitenhage before killing her was found guilty on numerous charges on Tuesday. Phumzile Mabope‚ 19‚ had pleaded guilty to the murder, but not the rape‚ saying he had intended to defile Maria Vermaak’s body after her death. The judge, however‚ said medical evidence provided in a postmortem report showed Mabope had raped the woman before she died. Handing down judgment yesterday‚ the judge said Mabope’s version of events in his plea did not add up and should be rejected. In his plea‚ Mabope claimed he had gone to the granny’s home on in February 2017 with the intention of stealing avocados grown on the property. Mabope was convicted on 12 charges‚ including seven counts of house robbery with intent to steal‚ robbery‚ rape and murder‚ among others.

How is no one buying these plump chickens?

The Desemele Project has been raising plump, quality, free-range chickens and pigs for the past three years, but it has been a struggle to find a market to sell them and finally make a profit. Since the farming initiative was started in the Karoo town of Aberdeen in 2015, the project has cost more than the rewards. Project chair Iviwe Desemele, who runs the farm with four others, said they were struggling to break into the market and finally make a success of the project. ‘Every day we’re pumping more and more money into this farm, and I haven’t seen a return on the capital I used to start it,’ she said. Desemele, 46, said she started the project because she wanted to create jobs for locals after she saw the conditions they were living in and how they were eating.

Boy brings school to tears with rap performance

When Buccleuch Primary School pupil Mihle Mbilase in Joburg broke out into a rap song he composed to comfort three classmates who had lost their father‚ there were tears all around. ‘I felt I needed to cheer up my friends and other kids‚ who do not spend time with their fathers‚ so I composed a song called Dad's Plan‚’ the 13-year-old said. His classmates‚ triplets Phefeni‚ Philani and Phoki Ngwenya‚ who are mentioned in the song‚ lost their father in April. ‘When they heard it‚ they started to cry. The teachers also cried‚’ Mihle said. The school's principal at the time said Mihle was honoured by the school in July for writing and rapping the amazing song to the pupils at lineup just before Father’s Day.

Vicious playground war leads to school shutdown

The Masakhaneni High School outside Durban has been closed as faction fighting – which has already claimed the lives of two pupils – spilled on to the playground. The education department said a decision was taken to suspend teaching and learning at the school until things calm down. KZN police said on Tuesday two pupils were killed in a knife fight. ‘They were taken to hospital, where they died on arrival.’ No arrests have been made.

THE WORLD

THE NEWS YOU DON'T NORMALLY GET TO HEAR

Sonic doom: VW ‘hail cannon’ causing drought, say farmers

Mexicans say the firm uses sonic devices to disrupt hail formation, but they're chasing away rain altogether

By AFP
2 min read

Game of Throngs: medieval gem now a ‘city of souvenirs’

Lord Byron’s Adriatic idyll is now a tourist-infested bag of nerves that appears on lists of destinations to avoid

By AFP
4 min read

It’s bad, folks: The polar ice that shouldn’t melt, is melting

The oldest and thickest ice caps, expected to be the last place to remain frozen as the world heats up ...

By Laura Donnelly
2 min read

Anyone else notice a chunk of their followers were gone?

Facebook and Twitter have taken down hundreds of fake accounts and pages

By James Titcomb
2 min read

SNAPSHOT

People watch elephants from a local circus taking a regular bath in the waters of the Black Sea on a hot summer day in Crimea.
It's a circus People watch elephants from a local circus taking a regular bath in the waters of the Black Sea on a hot summer day in Crimea.
Image: Reuters/Pavel Rebrov

SIX THINGS ABOUT THE WORLD YOU NEED TO KNOW

Wanna go ice-skating on the moon?

Scientists have confirmed there is ice on the moon's surface for the first time, a discovery that could one day help humans survive there. Signs of ice on the moon have been reported by scientists for years, but previous observations could have been explained by other phenomena, such as unusually reflective lunar soil, the study authors said. ‘This is the first time scientists have definitive evidence for the presence of water ice on the surface,’ lead author Shuai Li said. The polar regions where the ice lies are ‘super cold’, Li said. It is unclear exactly how much ice exists on the surface, he said. But NASA said if there was enough of the ice, ‘water would possibly be accessible as a resource for future expeditions to explore and even stay on the Moon’. – AFP

When beauty kills

The trial of Puerto Rican former beauty queen Aurea Vazquez Rijos, accused of hiring a hitman to kill her millionaire Canadian husband, got under after she spent several years in Europe as a fugitive. The defendant's objective was to ‘obtain financial gain’ with the death of Anhang, prosecutors say. She had signed a prenuptial agreement six months before ordering the murder of Anhang, the indictment added. ‘Shortly after getting married, Anhang Uster began to explore the possibility of divorcing the accused,’ the prosecution said. Under the terms of their agreement, she would receive much more as a widow than if she divorced.. The hitman later confessed to killing Anhang. Rijos fled to Italy in 2008. Finally, she was arrested in Spain in 2013 and then extradited. She has claimed she is innocent. – AFP

India, ignore fishermen at your peril

They carried their boats on to trucks to get there and braved the filthy, swirling waters before most other rescuers arrived. Now hundreds of fishermen are being hailed as the heroes of India's Kerala flood crisis. One man got on all fours with his face in the water so women could step on his back to board a rescue boat. Others had to suffer abuse from people angry because the official rescuers took so long. India’s tourism minister has called the fishermen the ‘biggest heroes’ of Kerala's disaster, and the state chief minister has announced a cash reward for each of them and a ceremony to pay tribute. The fishermen are, however, suspicious. Their community is disparaged by many in Kerala. Now they just hope the authorities keep their promise to pay for damage to boats and the fuel they used for the rescue. – AFP

Trash turns to ‘gold’ in Benin

A small village in Benin has opened a pilot waste treatment centre to turn household rubbish into gas – and cash. ‘Our trash has become gold. We no longer throw it into the bush. We use it to make money,’ beams Alphonse Ago, who lives next to the centre in Houegbo village. ReBin, a Swiss foundation for sustainable development, built the 1.3ha facility that every week turns around six tons of organic waste into 200 cubic metres of biogas – saving some 164 tons of wood from being used to make charcoal. The centre, which opened late last year, also plans to produce about 400 tons of organic fertiliser per year. So far, about 100 households in the area have signed up to the scheme to deposit their waste at the centre on a daily basis. Biogas is a precious commodity in a rural region where electricity remains scarce. – AFP

Inventor opens up possibilities for disabled sister

Jess Searle, 25, from South London, has a type of cerebral palsy that means she has always struggled with handheld devices or game consoles. With his sister in mind, Billy Searle, in his final year of Loughborough Design School, created a controller, shaped like an orb, to help people with disabilities improve their dexterity. He named the device 'Mylo' – a reference to the mile-long distance that Jess walked for charity in 2016. Billy hopes the controller could make gadgets and gaming more accessible as well as help develop muscles and movements. ‘The idea is that Mylo can be an occupational therapy system while being a fun, engaging exercise, something ... someone wants to engage with.’ After handling and playing with Mylo for about half an hour, Jess said the controller opened up more possibilities for her. – Reuters

Monkey business: man arrested for Nepal PM post

A man in Nepal was arrested for sharing a doctored image on Facebook showing Prime Minister KP Sharma Oli's head superimposed on a monkey's body. Homnath Sigdel, 44, was taken into custody on Tuesday for ‘sharing indecent photos that targeted the prime minister’, police in the country said. Offending image appeared on a Facebook group earlier this month, and has been shared more than 2,500 times. Police said Sigdel also posted a second photo of Oli's head on a naked human body. Sigdel could face up to five years in jail and a 100,000 rupee (R12,872) fine if found guilty. The arrest comes days after Nepal introduced new draconian laws that could be used to silence critics of the government. The government has shown increasing intolerance of dissent since it took power earlier this year. – AFP

THE BUSINESS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Basson’s courage points way forward for Shoprite

Now that he's gone, management will have to find a way to grow beyond local economic growth

By Tim Cohen
4 min read

Resilient’s little bounce may have been a tad premature

Investors seemed to have found an appetite recently for the embattled property group, until Wednesday that is

By Joan Muller
1 min read

Oh debt, where is thy sting? Actually it’s right here, Sun

A long way before Time Square starts spinning the cash flows that justify Sun International’s R4bn outlay

By Marc Hasenfuss
1 min read

LIFESTYLE

CULTURE COMES ALIVE

Out of the ordinary Audrey: How to steal Hepburn’s style

Decades on, she’s still a timeless fashion icon

By Caroline Leaper
2 min read

How Serena Williams made the US Open her catwalk

The star puts on a show during the tournament, and it's not all about tennis

By Nokuzola Leratho Zingithwa
1 min read

Dorothy Parker: Age will not wither, but wit sure would

A weekly column on the vagaries and charms of fashion

Aspasia Karras
Columnist
3 min read

Nkuli Mlangeni makes rugs to dye for

Award-winning textile designer and founder of The Ninevites in new collaboration with Trenery

By Staff reporter
1 min read

SPORT

FINISH LINE ESSENTIALS

SPORTS DAY: Steyn alive after yet another injury scare

Your roundup of the sporting news of the day

David Isaacson
Journalist
5 min read

For the love of the beautiful game, hit the flipping net!

It sure isn’t boring to have to keep talking about the lack of killer instinct in front of goal by PSL teams

By Nick Said
2 min read

Blast from the past: Ruddy marvellous run by Bevil in ’20

Today in SA sports history: August 23

David Isaacson
Journalist
1 min read