Thursday, February 8 2018

THE BIG STORIES

LEADING THE AGENDA

ZEXIT LOOMS: Now it's about the nitty-gritty

Zuma's office hasn't released engagements diary as Ramaphosa confirms an exit deal is in the making

By Thabo Mokone and Qaanitah Hunter
4 min read

Short-sellers make a mint on Steinhoff collapse

Two hedge funds pocketed R1.5bn from taking short positions in Steinhoff last year

By Moyagabo Maake
3 min read

IDEAS

TO FEED YOUR MIND

We're being led by bad example, and our children are watching

SA's 'hidden curriculum' of poor leadership doesn't bode well for our future

Jonathan Jansen
Columnist
4 min read

Inxeba’s bigoted critics ensure a valuable show goes on

This film is breathing life into a conversation we have too often avoided having

By Andile Ndlovu
3 min read

Have we reached Peak Zumxit or is it a mountain too high?

The long-awaited Zumectomy is the biggest story of the last decade

Tom Eaton
Columnist
2 min read

VISUAL SIDE

Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla Roadster automobile floated through space after it was carried there by SpaceX's Falcon Heavy.

SMART NEWS

IN ONE TAKE

Olivia Makete: The face of Jacob Zuma's ANC

Living in abject poverty, she went to Luthuli House to ask for water and electricity but instead got beaten up

Penwell Dlamini
Journalist
3 min read

It's a hard-knock life down at the harbour

Locals say the famous tourist destination in Hout Bay, Cape Town is going down the tubes

Bobby Jordan
Journalist
3 min read

‘I only want the same for her as any other parent wants for their child’

Parents fight for children with disabilities to access fee-free education

Farren Collins
Journalist
3 min read

Our big holes may come in handy after all

Old South African mines could get a new lease of life as hi-tech green energy stores

Dave Chambers
Cape Town bureau chief
2 min read

Gogo determined to get her land back

Octogenarian wants to expose the Ingonyama Trust, which she says stole her dream to help the disabled

Bongani Mthethwa
Journalist
3 min read

Cape-based doctor tells of desperation in Rohingya camps

Cape Town-based infectious diseases specialist says regional issues need to be resolved before more get sick

Matthew Savides
News editor
4 min read

SNAPSHOT

A young Venezuelan tries to make a living out of devalued Bolivar banknotes by making crafts with them.
Money's too tight to mention A young Venezuelan tries to make a living out of devalued Bolivar banknotes by making crafts with them.
Image: FEDERICO PARRA / AFP

Six things about SA you need to know

Secret smoke break caused police station fire

A policeman’s secret smoke break is thought to have forced the evacuation of the entire 14-storey Durban Central Police Station after a fire broke out in a bathroom on Wednesday. It is understood the fire started in a waste paper bin in a toilet on the 11th floor. SAPS spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel Thulani Zwane said that an alarm was sounded when officers reported smoke billowing from the windows. The rescue teams found that someone had thrown a cigarette butt into a bin‚ which caught on fire.

Drive to get amnesty for illegal immigrants

The African Diaspora Forum is seeking general amnesty for all undocumented immigrants in South Africa. The organisation's chairperson‚ Marc Gbaffou‚ was speaking at the South African Human Rights Commission's two-day national investigative hearing on migration‚ xenophobia and social cohesion hearings. Many immigrants' kids cannot go to school because their parents are illegal in this country‚ making the children illegal as well, he said. Although the South African constitution stipulates that every child has a right to education‚ some children of immigrants have continuously been denied these rights, Gbaffou added.

Firearms control laws face constitutional probe

The Police Minister on Wednesday asked the Constitutional Court to confirm that two sections in the Firearms Control Act were constitutional. The sections‚ if declared unconstitutional‚ will disrupt the police’s goal of regulating firearm ownership by requiring that each firearm owner has a licence which expires after a certain period, the minister said. The case, brought by the South African Hunters and Game Conservation Association, hinges on whether or not a licence to possess a firearm should for life.

Unisa students warn of fees ‘trouble’

KwaZulu-Natal University of South Africa students who claim to have been left high and dry by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NFSAS) have issued a warning of “trouble” if their finances are not resolved. Nkanyiso Zwide‚ Unisa Durban SRC treasurer-general‚ said several hundred students had not received their study grants and thus could not commence with the academic year. The development sparked clashes between students and police‚ which saw running battles at the central Durban campus on Monday. “The CEO of NFSAS is expected to come to Unisa on Thursday, as far as I know. If they do not come there will be trouble‚” he said.

Murder accused Rohde struggling with depression

Jason Rohde’s “severe‚ major depression episodes” could have been caused by his inability to maintain a strong façade for his children. This was the testimony of his psychiatrist‚ Dr Kevin Stoloff‚ during an inquiry into the businessman’s breach of his bail conditions in the High Court in Cape Town on Wednesday. Rohde was supposed to appear in court on Monday for the recommencement of his trial‚ which was adjourned in November. His legal team said he had been admitted to the Crescent Clinic‚ a private hospital. Rohde is charged with murdering his wife‚ Susan‚ and obstructing the administration of justice by making her death look like a suicide. They have three daughters. The trial was postponed to February 22, and the court has be given an update on Rhode’s condition two days earlier.

Food tops South Africans’ December spending

South Africans did not use December bonuses to pay off loans, book holidays or buy school uniforms and stationery ahead of the new school year. Instead, most of their December spending went towards food, BankservAfrica‚ Africa’s largest automated payments clearing house, said on Wednesday. According to their Economic Transaction Index‚ the main purchases recorded over the December holidays were at grocery stores and supermarkets - followed by service stations‚ eating places and restaurants‚ family clothing stores‚ and convenience stores and specialty markets‚ indicating the greater spending tendency towards consumables‚ the group said.

BESPOKE

THE WORLD IN FULL COLOUR

It’s old yet ever new in Cape Town

Repurposing old buildings is not a new phenomenon in the country’s oldest city 

Tanya Farber
Journalist
3 min read

THE WORLD

STUFF THAT MATTERS

Maldives power struggle: Trouble in paradise

The ugly politics behind the beautiful beaches

By AFP
3 min read

What next, O Supreme Ruler Trump? The goose step?

The US military’s top officer said planning is underway after Donald Trump ordered a military parade.

By AFP
2 min read

Cheddar Man proves that lily-white Britons idea is cheese

The first Britons were black skinned and blue-eyed

By Henry Bodkin
2 min read

'I won $560m, but I don't want anyone to know'

A lottery winner goes to court to hide her identity

By Harriet Alexander
1 min read

Ode to Nigel: He had no friends - that’s how he liked it

‘World’s loneliest bird’ dies in New Zealand 

By AFP
1 min read

SNAPSHOT

Fools dressed in 'Donaueschinger Schellenberghexen' carnival witch costumes in Stuttgart, southern Germany.
They said she looked like her mother Fools dressed in 'Donaueschinger Schellenberghexen' carnival witch costumes in Stuttgart, southern Germany.
Image: MARIJAN MURAT / DPA / AFP

SIX THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE WORLD

What's it with the US and pushing alarm buttons?

First Hawaiians thought they were about to be blown to glory by a missile. Now the US east coast was told that it was about to be hit by a tsunami. A “routine test message” was erroneously transmitted by at least one weather app to smartphone users as a push notification alerting them to a tsunami. While there were no reports of panic, the National Weather Service issued multiple clarifications to assure the public that there was no danger. — AFP

Real-life beetlejuice is worse than the movies

In Tim Burton’s classic comedy ‘Beetlejuice’, the toxic title character can escape from his inferno only if someone pronounces his name three times in a row. The real-world bombardier beetle escapes from its purgatory — the belly of a predator — by squirting the real thing: boiling-hot pulses of noxious beetle juice, forcing an attacker to vomit up its would-be prey, researchers report. The beetles just shake it off and walk away. — AFP

Former pope writes a benediction to his own life

Former pope Benedict said in a letter on Wednesday that he is in the last phase of life and on a “pilgrimage towards home’’. Benedict, who in February 2013 became the first pope in six centuries to resign, said: ‘I am moved that so many readers want to know how I spend my days in this, the last period of the life. I can only say that with the slow withering of my physical forces, interiorly, I am on a pilgrimage towards home.’ — Reuters

Alzheimer's sufferers in for a shock

A device that gives the brain electric shocks has prompted hope for Alzheimer’s patients after an initial trial showed it could improve memory by 15%. The US study was described as “promising” by British experts, but they cautioned it was too early to say for sure if it promises a treatment for dementia. — © The Daily Telegraph

It just gets better and better for 'Star Wars' fans

Disney on Tuesday announced it was expanding its ‘Star Wars’ universe, hiring the creators behind the massive TV hit ‘Game of Thrones’ to write a new series of films set in the galaxy far, far away. The new series will be separate from both the episodic Skywalker saga and the recently announced trilogy being developed by director Rian Johnson. — AFP

I'd kiss a girl in a whole new way now, says Perry

It was the song that catapulted her to fame and became an instant earworm in 2008, but a decade on, Katy Perry says she would amend the lyrics to ‘I Kissed A Girl’. ‘We’ve really changed, conversationally, in the past 10 years,’ she said. ‘We’ve come a long way. Bisexuality wasn’t as talked about back then, or any type of fluidity. If I had to write that song again, I probably would make an edit on it. Lyrically, it has a couple of stereotypes in it. Your mind changes so much in 10 years, and you grow so much.’ — © The Daily Telegraph

THE BUSINESS

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

Surreal politics play out for indaba folk

Radebe delivers clear message as he upstages Zwane at ministerial symposium

By Hilary Joffe
4 min read

COMPANY COMMENT: Heat on Investec and Naspers

Business Leadership SA’s stance on the appointment of joint CEOs at Investec is at once predictable and surprising

By BusinessLIVE
3 min read

It's a new drug war, but this one's in the diabetes market

Danish insulin-maker's long-term growth depends on new oral drug to replace insulin jab

By Reuters
4 min read

LIFESTYLE

CULTURE COMES ALIVE

Fear and clothing: separating soul from shoe

A weekly reflection on the vagaries and charms of fashion.

Aspasia Karras
Columnist
3 min read

Collections men swear by

Menswear Week starts today. Here are three designers to watch

By Nothemba Mkhondo
1 min read

SPORT

FINISH LINE ESSENTIALS

SPORTS DAY: Everything you need to know

David Isaacson rounds up the sporting news.

By Agencies
5 min read

Blitzboks are inches away from the slavering pack

They are consistent, but not dominant

By Craig Ray
3 min read

Blasts from the past

This day in sporting history

By David Isaacson
1 min read